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The Language of Men isn't just a beautifully written memoir about a Vietnam vet father and the complicated legacy he leaves to his son; it's also a disturbing, brutally honest, darkly funny meditation on masculinity, violence, and sexuality.

 

                     "...an impressive debut from a young writer..."

                                                                      -TRACY KIDDER

                                              "D'Aries is a writer to watch."

                                                                     -TOM PERROTTA


"HOLD THE PHONE, kick down the door, and yell from the rootops of all those blue-collar American towns that give birth to so many of our artists: a new one is among us, and his name is Anthony D'Aries. This man writes like Charlie Parker played the alto sax, with grit and verve and a willing free-fall into hard-won illuminated truths."

                                                                                                             -ANDRE DUBUS III


WINNER - PEN/New England Discovery Award

WINNER - ForeWord Magazine's Memoir of the Year

WINNER - New England Book Festival

WINNER - Silver IPPY

FINALIST - Fourth Genre's Michael Steinberg Essay Prize

FINALIST - Diana Woods Memorial Creative Nonfiction Award

 

Anthony D'Aries is the author of The Language of Men: A Memoir (Hudson Whitman/Excelsior College Press, 2012). His essays have appeared in Solstice, The Good Men Project, Shelf Awareness, The Literary Review, and elsewhere. In 2011, Anthony was selected as Randolph College's Emerging Writer-in-Residence. For the past six years, he has taught literacy and creative writing in correctional facilities.  As Assistant Professor of English and Director of the Writing Program at Regis College, he teaches courses in creative nonfiction, writing as community service, and copyediting as well as freshman composition. Recently, Anthony was appointed to the board of PEN/New England as a member of the Freedom-to-Write Committee. He is currently the nonfiction fellow at The Writers' Room of Boston.